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Little Greene

Little Greene is an independent, British paint and wallpaper manufacturer, committed to the socially and environmentally responsible production of high quality paints and wallpapers.With records dating back to the year 1773, the Little Greene Dye Works of Collyhurst Wood, on the outskirts of Manchester is one of England’s most ancient industrial sites for the making of paints and dye solutions. They incorporate many of the materials used in the past for the preparation of the very high quality paints they make today.


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Product Colour

  • Light Beauvais (323)

    8.00204.00
    A subtle reduction of the delicate Beauvais Lilac 29, this shade offers a notable warmth when used against Loft White 222. For a very soft contrast, pair it with Ferdinand 313 and bring depth to the scheme using deeper, related tones: Nether Red 315 and Arras 316.
  • Book Room Green (322)

    8.00204.00
    At the turn of the 19th century, the Book Room at Wimpole Hall was remodelled by neoclassical architect John Soane. Driven by Wimpole?s owner?s keen architectural interest, the room doubled in size and this neutral green was specified as a foil to the room?s fine white plasterwork and shelving, and the thousands of deep red embossed leather book spines which covered the walls.
  • Baluster (321)

    8.00128.00
    An authentic grey limestone, this shade is read directly from the carved balustrade which accompanies the Castell Pink stonework in the great stairwell at Penrhyn Castle. It was commissioned by the castle?s owner, a wealthy slate baron, and took 10 years to complete. The intermediate depth of this colour makes it a versatile shade, useful in both traditional and contemporary schemes. Highly impactful used in isolation, it?s also very easy to coordinate with a range of natural stone and wood surfaces.
  • Elysian Ground (320)

    8.00128.00
    In 1738 the architect William Kent ? renowned for his follies - designed a small, stilted, timber garden room to stand in the middle of a pond within the Elysian Fields at Stowe in Buckinghamshire. It was first decorated by the Italian painter Francesco Sleter, who combined figurines, foliage and calligraphy in an intricate Chinoiserie style, with this sumptuous deep stone colour as a background
  • Travertine (319)

    8.00204.00
    In its varied history, Basildon Park has served 150 years as a grand family home, a period as a convalescent hospital in World War 1, an army barracks in World War 2, and even survived an attempt to be dismantled and rebuilt brick-by-brick in America. Fortunately, in the 1950s it came into the philanthropic hands of Lord and Lady Iliffe who endowed upon it a passion for renaissance interiors. This warm neutral was used on the walls of the Staircase Hall, designed to feel more like a sitting room than a cold corridor.
  • Scullery (318)

    8.00128.00
    Taken from the pantry door at Wimpole Hall, this shade is typical of the drab colours used to paint ?back-of-house? areas, where waiting staff would prepare meals and refreshments for the owners of such grand country mansions. These colours were popular because they didn?t show dirt or damage easily, and were thriftily produced by blending leftover paints and pigments from the decoration of the main house. .
  • Lute (317)

    8.00204.00
    The writer, music critic and BBC broadcaster Edward ?Eddy? Sackville-West, a peripheral character in the celebrated Bloomsbury Group of the 1920s, lived in several rooms in the Gatehouse Tower at his family home of Knole in Kent. Eddy?s private domain, accessed via a compact stone spiral staircase, included a bedroom, study and music room, where he would entertain fellow academics, philosophers, friends and lovers. This colour is taken from the fireplace in his bedroom, where it?s offset with a blue surround and charismatic lime-plastered walls.
  • Arras (316)

    8.00128.00
    A spectacular Elizabethan house, Hardwick Hall was built by the formidable ?Bess of Hardwick? in the late 1500s. After Queen Elizabeth I, Bess was the wealthiest woman in England and her house was filled with rich furnishings and tapestries. Within the house, a chapel contains rare wall hangings, painted with scenes from the life of St Paul, where this deep, earthy red repeatedly features.
  • Nether Red (315)

    8.00128.00
    Since ancient times, Alderley Edge in Cheshire has been famous for its local copper mine, and for Nether Alderley Mill, a traditional flour mill which has been central to local agriculture for over 600 years. This beautiful and profound mud red is found in the bare sandstone walls of the original mill, and can be seen in its full glory on the south-west face.
  • Castell Pink (314)

    8.00204.00
    This soft plaster-like shade is taken from a reading of the sculptural stonework which surrounds the great stairwell at Penrhyn Castle in North Wales.
  • Ferdinand (313)

    8.00204.00
    Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire was built by Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild in 1883 as a country retreat; a place to host weekend house parties and an escape from London during the summer months. This elegant, warm, off-white is found on the wall panelling in the Grey Drawing Room - a place where guests came to relax, play cards and listen to music.
  • Pompeian Ash (293)

    8.00128.00
    One of the most unusual British homes, 200-year-old Ickworth House in Suffolk was commissioned as the private residence of enigmatic world-traveller Frederick Hervey, on an estate the family had owned since the mid-15th century. The design of the 19th-century Pompeian room was based on ancient frescoes excavated at Villa Negroni, Rome. At Ickworth this dark grey-green performed the role of black in its striking Palladian colour scheme.

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