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  • This design is an accurate reproduction of one of several wallpapers found in a private residence in St James Place, London, dating from around 1840. Its ornate, block printed decorative detail gives a subtle artisan quality, and the original, richly coloured blue and red colourway, faithfully reproduced for this collection, is very typical of the Regency era.
  • A classic ?Roman? or Regency proportion stripe originally produced in the 18th Century using the ?open trough? method, in which the stripes were created by bands of paint seeping through holes or slots in the bottom of a wooden trough, onto the surface of the paper as it was pulled beneath. Striped wallpapers manufactured in this way are characterised by a brushed finish which was later superseded by a flatter print achieved with 19th Century rollers, as is evidenced in these papers.
  • A classic damask design that is very typical of the popular large-scale pomegranate patterns of the mid-18th century, this would originally have been a flock wallpaper and hung in a grand English home. Flock papers were an English speciality and were really just imitations of expensive textiles, but nonetheless, they were expensive to produce and a bold statement of luxury and social status.
  • A large-scale pattern, reminiscent of an early 20th century interpretation of one of Robert Adam?s designs. This paper was discovered just after the death of Queen Mary, who lived in Marlborough House until 1953, after which the house became the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.
  • An abstract paper, which, despite its contemporary appearance, probably dates back to the early 1800s when such designs were hugely popular. The original colourway, featuring orangey stars on a pinky-yellow ground, was discovered on an upper floor of a commercial property that had been refaced in the early nineteenth century but was most probably a much older building.
  • A flamboyant peacock feather design, this wallpaper was found in the attics of 18 Carlton House Terrace, a beautiful stucco-faced London town house overlooking The Mall. Originally machine-printed in green on a yellow background, the surface-printed technique used to recreate it accurately reflects the feel of the original, whilst a judicious splash of colour in the feather provides something on which to anchor
  • A typical historic damask, the design source was originally a woven silk from the 19th century, the effect of which is replicated in the print detail. Like the design High Street from London Wallpapers III, there are known examples of this pattern in more than one location, making it likely it was being produced in significant quantity from as early as the 18th century through to the late 19th: this is commensurate with the manufacturing capabilities of the industry at this time.
  • Whilst the original fragment was discovered at Bayham Abbey, on the Sussex-Kent border, the paper is likely to have been produced in London. On a red ground, reminiscent of gothic style, the original paper was made from cellulose wood pulp and machine-printed.
  • This classic Georgian design can be seen at Greyfriars, a medieval timber house in Worcester. The property?s 20th Century owner, Elsie Moore, acquired some unused rolls from a rectory attic in nearby Pershore, and displayed sections of them as framed panels in her bright yellow dining room. Suspecting that the turquoise pigment in the ground could have been arsenic, she covered the panels in plain brown paper to prevent the unwitting poisoning of either herself or her guests. The holes made by the pins she used can still be seen today, but the paper is, thankfully, (safely) back on show. The scale of the original pattern has been reduced for usability, whilst the four colourways include a nod to the original, a traditional interpretation and more contemporary options.
  • A rare and very early find, this Baroque design was uncovered by the National Trust Papers, hiding beneath wall-hung tapestries at Erddig in Wales. Block-printed onto handmade paper panels, which would have been nailed directly to the wall (rather than glued), their removal revealed the earliest verified tax-stamp on the reverse. The colourful yellow original has been pared down for one of four tonal colourways. A further three colourways bring versatility to the modern use of this lively paisley design.
  • A rare and very early find, this Baroque design was uncovered by the National Trust Papers, hiding beneath wall-hung tapestries at Erddig in Wales. Block-printed onto handmade paper panels, which would have been nailed directly to the wall (rather than glued), their removal revealed the earliest verified tax-stamp on the reverse. The colourful yellow original has been pared down for one of four tonal colourways. A further three colourways bring versatility to the modern use of this lively paisley design.
  • This flamboyant, vibrant peacock design is a beautiful example of late-19th century wallpaper printing. Found on a lobby wall at Erddig in Wales, it was hung in the 1870s, and has the painterly finish of a traditional Chinese silk. Showing peacocks perched on branches, accessorised by flowers, leaves and birds, the subject is typical of wallpapers and fabrics produced to satisfy the western elite?s interest in Chinese design. Coloured in eight vibrant ways including elegant pale and bolder dark grounds, and even a shimmering gold

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