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  • Very much a twentieth century design, this is a 1950?s English pattern found at the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester. A band of fine, single colour white stripes over flat ground(s), it?s in fact the space between stripes that creates the subtle optical movement. The more complex striped versions contain an additional three ground colours each, and the plain versions are produced in matching colourways to specifically coordinate with the different elements of the stripe, offering a highly flexible range of papers to be used in combination in traditional and contemporary homes alike.
  • Very much a twentieth century design, this is a 1950?s English pattern found at the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester. A band of fine, single colour white stripes over flat ground(s), it?s in fact the space between stripes that creates the subtle optical movement. The more complex striped versions contain an additional three ground colours each, and the plain versions are produced in matching colourways to specifically coordinate with the different elements of the stripe, offering a highly flexible range of papers to be used in combination in traditional and contemporary homes alike.
  • This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House next to St James?s Park; a grand abode, designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombr? effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of the making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design
  • An abstract paper, which, despite its contemporary appearance, probably dates back to the early 1800s when such designs were hugely popular. The original colourway, featuring orangey stars on a pinky-yellow ground, was discovered on an upper floor of a commercial property that had been refaced in the early nineteenth century but was most probably a much older building.
  • One of the most impressive squares in London, Bedford Square was originally laid out in 1775?6 and, until World War II, the majority of its houses were inhabited by lawyers, architects, publishers and other professionals. The original of this paper was saved from a property in the square, and is of a design typical of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • With its single print colour, this paper is a younger sister to the design Marlborough, but carries the same delicate elegance. Amazingly, both papers were recorded from the same property, Marlborough House overlooking St James? Park. The date cites the likely origin of the paper used in Marlborough rather than the neoclassical roots of the design, which would be attributed to the architectural trend of the early-19th century.
  • From a stylistic point of view, this motif is undeniably French. However, the piece of archive comes from a prestigious address near the Thames. The decorative strip on each side of the flower column has been kept but lightened to give more balance to the repeating pattern.
  • The property from which this design hails was built in the mid-19th century on the site of the infamous Marshalsea Prison, which for nearly 500 years was notorious for the incarceration of London?s debtors, including Charles Dickens? father in 1824. The earliest paper retrieved from a laminate of four, this gothic trellis design with Moorish influences was the first paper to adorn the walls of one of the properties that replaced the prison in the late 1870s.
  • Whilst the original fragment was discovered at Bayham Abbey, on the Sussex-Kent border, the paper is likely to have been produced in London. On a red ground, reminiscent of gothic style, the original paper was made from cellulose wood pulp and machine-printed.
  • Whilst the original fragment was discovered at Bayham Abbey, on the Sussex-Kent border, the paper is likely to have been produced in London. On a red ground, reminiscent of gothic style, the original paper was made from cellulose wood pulp and machine-printed.
  • Whilst the original fragment was discovered at Bayham Abbey, on the Sussex-Kent border, the paper is likely to have been produced in London. On a red ground, reminiscent of gothic style, the original paper was made from cellulose wood pulp and machine-printed.
  • Reminiscent of Spitalfields silks, this paper, found in Albemarle Street, off Piccadilly, had an enormous pattern repeat of 6ft. Originally produced in a dark blue flock on a light ground, it was unusual to find so bold and expensive a paper used as here, in a low ceilinged, second floor bedroom. Such a grand paper would have been designed to have been on show ? more often in a downstairs reception room where guests would be entertained.

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