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  • Originally produced as a design on fabric, the larger scale production of this classic 19th Century stripe was a natural development from the early ?open trough? printing method referred to in ?Broad Stripe?. Its name is taken from the Regency fashion of hanging fabrics in a room to create a ?tented? effect.
  • A faithful reproduction of an historic French wallpaper. Perhaps surprisingly, the original hails from 1830 and was printed in a bold combination of yellow and pink. Particular attention is paid to the paint reticulation (also known as the seaweed effect) evident within the printed spot element, in giving orientation ? there is a right way up and wrong way up for this paper to be hung.
  • Very much a twentieth century design, this is a 1950?s English pattern found at the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester. A band of fine, single colour white stripes over flat ground(s), it?s in fact the space between stripes that creates the subtle optical movement. The more complex striped versions contain an additional three ground colours each, and the plain versions are produced in matching colourways to specifically coordinate with the different elements of the stripe, offering a highly flexible range of papers to be used in combination in traditional and contemporary homes alike.
  • Taking the exact proportion and structural quality of the Broad Stripe, each band in this more complex version comprises 42 ?pin stripes,? creating a sharper, more contemporary look that appeals at first glance and offers more on closer inspection. Given its finer proportions, this design would have been virtually impossible to print before the arrival of the print roller in around 1840.
  • In keeping with its sister wallpaper ?Marlborough? from our London WallpapersII collection, the age of the paper on which this design is based is perhaps misleading in terms of its provenance. Dated at 1965, this particular fragment emerged during English Heritage?s restoration work at Marlborough Houseon Pall Mall, London, though this paper in itself was based on an original from much earlier. In our interpretation, the motif ? in fact a flock ? has been completely removed to leave a cleaner, more versatile stripe.
  • The original wallpaper that inspired this design, found at a property in Carlisle Street in Soho, London, is actually a much more complex pattern than the design we have extracted from it. By removing the solid stripes and extraneous leaf trail, we are left with a wallpaper that achieves all-over pattern and an elegant stripe at the same time.
  • A classic ?Roman? or Regency proportion stripe originally produced in the 18th Century using the ?open trough? method, in which the stripes were created by bands of paint seeping through holes or slots in the bottom of a wooden trough, onto the surface of the paper as it was pulled beneath. Striped wallpapers manufactured in this way are characterised by a brushed finish which was later superseded by a flatter print achieved with 19th Century rollers, as is evidenced in these papers.
  • A classic damask design that is very typical of the popular large-scale pomegranate patterns of the mid-18th century, this would originally have been a flock wallpaper and hung in a grand English home. Flock papers were an English speciality and were really just imitations of expensive textiles, but nonetheless, they were expensive to produce and a bold statement of luxury and social status.
  • This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House next to St James?s Park; a grand abode, designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombr? effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of the making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design
  • Based on one of the oldest surviving documents in English Heritage?s wallpaper archive, this fragment from an embossed leather wall hanging actually predates wallpaper. Panels of embossed and painted leather, usually with a floral pattern, were popular, though expensive, modes of decoration in the late-16th and 17th centuries. These panels were sewn together to create large-scale decorative hangings, much in the same way that drops of wallpaper are hung side-by-side to create a much more impressive statement.
  • A large-scale pattern, reminiscent of an early 20th century interpretation of one of Robert Adam?s designs. This paper was discovered just after the death of Queen Mary, who lived in Marlborough House until 1953, after which the house became the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.
  • An abstract paper, which, despite its contemporary appearance, probably dates back to the early 1800s when such designs were hugely popular. The original colourway, featuring orangey stars on a pinky-yellow ground, was discovered on an upper floor of a commercial property that had been refaced in the early nineteenth century but was most probably a much older building.

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