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  • Another Twentieth Century stripe, each of these papers contains a judicious balance of six tightly packed colours, giving each an overall theme and several opportunities for picking out painted walls and trim. Inspired by the way designers would ?tag? colours together in referencing interior design schemes, and inherently close to the way colours were handled by fashion.
  • A classic damask design that is very typical of the popular large-scale pomegranate patterns of the mid-18th century, this would originally have been a flock wallpaper and hung in a grand English home. Flock papers were an English speciality and were really just imitations of expensive textiles, but nonetheless, they were expensive to produce and a bold statement of luxury and social status.
  • This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House next to St James?s Park; a grand abode, designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombr? effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of the making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design
  • An abstract paper, which, despite its contemporary appearance, probably dates back to the early 1800s when such designs were hugely popular. The original colourway, featuring orangey stars on a pinky-yellow ground, was discovered on an upper floor of a commercial property that had been refaced in the early nineteenth century but was most probably a much older building.
  • An Arts & Crafts motif in the manner of Voysey, a leading light of the movement who was perhaps more famous as an architect than as a wallpaper designer. Although this colourful wallpaper was removed from a 19th century house in Kensington, its actual design dates it to the early 20th century.
  • A flamboyant peacock feather design, this wallpaper was found in the attics of 18 Carlton House Terrace, a beautiful stucco-faced London town house overlooking The Mall. Originally machine-printed in green on a yellow background, the surface-printed technique used to recreate it accurately reflects the feel of the original, whilst a judicious splash of colour in the feather provides something on which to anchor
  • A flamboyant peacock feather design, this wallpaper was found in the attics of 18 Carlton House Terrace, a beautiful stucco-faced London town house overlooking The Mall. Originally machine-printed in green on a yellow background, the surface-printed technique used to recreate it accurately reflects the feel of the original, whilst a judicious splash of colour in the feather provides something on which to anchor
  • One of the most impressive squares in London, Bedford Square was originally laid out in 1775?6 and, until World War II, the majority of its houses were inhabited by lawyers, architects, publishers and other professionals. The original of this paper was saved from a property in the square, and is of a design typical of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Unbefitting to the quality of this 19th century paper, the surviving sample was retrieved, not from the walls of a smart Richmond townhouse, but from a skip outside it, during a 1989 refurbishment. A delicate tudor rose, the execution is typical of many designs produced in the style of William Morris in the late 19th century. Little Greene has printed it in two authentic Arts & Crafts colourways, three classic colourways and a modern metallic.
  • Unbefitting to the quality of this 19th century paper, the surviving sample was retrieved, not from the walls of a smart Richmond townhouse, but from a skip outside it, during a 1989 refurbishment. A delicate tudor rose, the execution is typical of many designs produced in the style of William Morris in the late 19th century. Little Greene has printed it in two authentic Arts & Crafts colourways, three classic colourways and a modern metallic.
  • A rare and very early find, this Baroque design was uncovered by the National Trust Papers, hiding beneath wall-hung tapestries at Erddig in Wales. Block-printed onto handmade paper panels, which would have been nailed directly to the wall (rather than glued), their removal revealed the earliest verified tax-stamp on the reverse. The colourful yellow original has been pared down for one of four tonal colourways. A further three colourways bring versatility to the modern use of this lively paisley design.
  • This flamboyant, vibrant peacock design is a beautiful example of late-19th century wallpaper printing. Found on a lobby wall at Erddig in Wales, it was hung in the 1870s, and has the painterly finish of a traditional Chinese silk. Showing peacocks perched on branches, accessorised by flowers, leaves and birds, the subject is typical of wallpapers and fabrics produced to satisfy the western elite?s interest in Chinese design. Coloured in eight vibrant ways including elegant pale and bolder dark grounds, and even a shimmering gold

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