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  • Faithfully reproduced, but increased in scale, from a fabulous English Heritage piece, this historical panorama of the capital was published by The London Illustrated News in 1851. This hand drawn, hand painted scene depicts the buildings and landscape along the River Thames at the time and has been remastered to include a repeating section meaning it can be hung on any size wall. The original would have been shown at cornice height, but in rooms of a more normal scale, it has been created to sit comfortably at dado or skirting height as well.
  • This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House next to St James?s Park; a grand abode, designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombr? effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of the making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design
  • This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House next to St James?s Park; a grand abode, designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombr? effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of the making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design
  • This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House next to St James?s Park; a grand abode, designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombr? effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of the making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design
  • Based on one of the oldest surviving documents in English Heritage?s wallpaper archive, this fragment from an embossed leather wall hanging actually predates wallpaper. Panels of embossed and painted leather, usually with a floral pattern, were popular, though expensive, modes of decoration in the late-16th and 17th centuries. These panels were sewn together to create large-scale decorative hangings, much in the same way that drops of wallpaper are hung side-by-side to create a much more impressive statement.
  • This large damask pattern was found in Marlborough House next to St James?s Park; a grand abode, designed by Christopher Wren and home to the Duchess of Marlborough, friend and confidante of Queen Anne. Originally a dark blue flock on a pale blue ground, the paper is believed to be comparatively recent, though the origins of the general design are Victorian (as a wallpaper) and older still (as a silk fabric). The twist in this interpretation is the light-to-dark ombr? effect, which puts bolder colour at the base of the wall and lighter above, with the effect of the making a space feel taller and lighter than it would with a conventional damask design
  • Based on one of the oldest surviving documents in English Heritage?s wallpaper archive, this fragment from an embossed leather wall hanging actually predates wallpaper. Panels of embossed and painted leather, usually with a floral pattern, were popular, though expensive, modes of decoration in the late-16th and 17th centuries. These panels were sewn together to create large-scale decorative hangings, much in the same way that drops of wallpaper are hung side-by-side to create a much more impressive statement.
  • Based on one of the oldest surviving documents in English Heritage?s wallpaper archive, this fragment from an embossed leather wall hanging actually predates wallpaper. Panels of embossed and painted leather, usually with a floral pattern, were popular, though expensive, modes of decoration in the late-16th and 17th centuries. These panels were sewn together to create large-scale decorative hangings, much in the same way that drops of wallpaper are hung side-by-side to create a much more impressive statement.
  • A large-scale pattern, reminiscent of an early 20th century interpretation of one of Robert Adam?s designs. This paper was discovered just after the death of Queen Mary, who lived in Marlborough House until 1953, after which the house became the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.
  • Based on one of the oldest surviving documents in English Heritage?s wallpaper archive, this fragment from an embossed leather wall hanging actually predates wallpaper. Panels of embossed and painted leather, usually with a floral pattern, were popular, though expensive, modes of decoration in the late-16th and 17th centuries. These panels were sewn together to create large-scale decorative hangings, much in the same way that drops of wallpaper are hung side-by-side to create a much more impressive statement.
  • A large-scale pattern, reminiscent of an early 20th century interpretation of one of Robert Adam?s designs. This paper was discovered just after the death of Queen Mary, who lived in Marlborough House until 1953, after which the house became the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.
  • A large-scale pattern, reminiscent of an early 20th century interpretation of one of Robert Adam?s designs. This paper was discovered just after the death of Queen Mary, who lived in Marlborough House until 1953, after which the house became the headquarters of the Commonwealth Secretariat.

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