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  • A typical historic damask, the design source was originally a woven silk from the 19th century, the effect of which is replicated in the print detail. Like the design High Street from London Wallpapers III, there are known examples of this pattern in more than one location, making it likely it was being produced in significant quantity from as early as the 18th century through to the late 19th: this is commensurate with the manufacturing capabilities of the industry at this time.
  • A typical historic damask, the design source was originally a woven silk from the 19th century, the effect of which is replicated in the print detail. Like the design High Street from London Wallpapers III, there are known examples of this pattern in more than one location, making it likely it was being produced in significant quantity from as early as the 18th century through to the late 19th: this is commensurate with the manufacturing capabilities of the industry at this time.
  • A typical historic damask, the design source was originally a woven silk from the 19th century, the effect of which is replicated in the print detail. Like the design High Street from London Wallpapers III, there are known examples of this pattern in more than one location, making it likely it was being produced in significant quantity from as early as the 18th century through to the late 19th: this is commensurate with the manufacturing capabilities of the industry at this time.
  • A typical historic damask, the design source was originally a woven silk from the 19th century, the effect of which is replicated in the print detail. Like the design High Street from London Wallpapers III, there are known examples of this pattern in more than one location, making it likely it was being produced in significant quantity from as early as the 18th century through to the late 19th: this is commensurate with the manufacturing capabilities of the industry at this time.
  • A typical historic damask, the design source was originally a woven silk from the 19th century, the effect of which is replicated in the print detail. Like the design High Street from London Wallpapers III, there are known examples of this pattern in more than one location, making it likely it was being produced in significant quantity from as early as the 18th century through to the late 19th: this is commensurate with the manufacturing capabilities of the industry at this time.
  • A typical historic damask, the design source was originally a woven silk from the 19th century, the effect of which is replicated in the print detail. Like the design High Street from London Wallpapers III, there are known examples of this pattern in more than one location, making it likely it was being produced in significant quantity from as early as the 18th century through to the late 19th: this is commensurate with the manufacturing capabilities of the industry at this time.
  • A typical historic damask, the design source was originally a woven silk from the 19th century, the effect of which is replicated in the print detail. Like the design High Street from London Wallpapers III, there are known examples of this pattern in more than one location, making it likely it was being produced in significant quantity from as early as the 18th century through to the late 19th: this is commensurate with the manufacturing capabilities of the industry at this time.
  • This mid-18th century paper, found in Cranford, Middlesex, has a yellow floral ogee motif printed on to thick, hand-made rag paper. It is unusual because yellow, although a popular colour, was expensive and prone to fading. It was manufactured using ?slip-printing?, a technique to make the paper appear more expensive than it really was due to its ?shadow? effect, which was achieved economically by using the same block to print two different colours.
  • This mid-18th century paper, found in Cranford, Middlesex, has a yellow floral ogee motif printed on to thick, hand-made rag paper. It is unusual because yellow, although a popular colour, was expensive and prone to fading. It was manufactured using ?slip-printing?, a technique to make the paper appear more expensive than it really was due to its ?shadow? effect, which was achieved economically by using the same block to print two different colours.
  • This mid-18th century paper, found in Cranford, Middlesex, has a yellow floral ogee motif printed on to thick, hand-made rag paper. It is unusual because yellow, although a popular colour, was expensive and prone to fading. It was manufactured using ?slip-printing?, a technique to make the paper appear more expensive than it really was due to its ?shadow? effect, which was achieved economically by using the same block to print two different colours.
  • From a stylistic point of view, this motif is undeniably French. However, the piece of archive comes from a prestigious address near the Thames. The decorative strip on each side of the flower column has been kept but lightened to give more balance to the repeating pattern.
  • From a stylistic point of view, this motif is undeniably French. However, the piece of archive comes from a prestigious address near the Thames. The decorative strip on each side of the flower column has been kept but lightened to give more balance to the repeating pattern.

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